The role of ‘longer-duration storage’ in the future of energy

Highview Power’s liquid air energy storage (LAES) is being deployed at a 50MW / 250MWh site, with a portion of the costs supported by the UK government. Image: Highview Power.

What are the best ways to match up long-duration energy storage technologies to applications and revenues? And what is ‘longer-duration’ storage and when will we need it? Florian Mayr and Dr Fabio Oldenburg at Apricum – The Cleantech Advisory offer some perspectives. This is a short extract of an article which originally appeared in Vol.26 of PV Tech Power, our quarterly journal and can be found in the Storage & Smart Power section contributed to each edition by the team at Energy-Storage.news. 

Between five and more than 1,000 hours of energy discharge – that’s what the term “long-duration energy storage” encompasses in the industry today. It’s a very broad definition that covers a wide array of storage technologies and use cases.

An increasing number of projects within this diverse space has been announced over the last few months. UK transmission system operator National Grid ordered a 50MW overground liquid air energy storage (LAES) system with a five-hour discharge duration from Highview Power that will be connected to the grid in 2022.

Read the full article here.

OUR PARTNERS